Answer to Questions about the Compression and Inversion Model

(posed through the UNF Faculty Association)

Question:

Some 15 plus years ago money were available for compression/inversion (C/I/D). About 70% of it was given to adjust salary to the Professor rank. When others complained they were told to get promotion for raise. Some did just that. This time around even though some department Professors got big raises but in most departments Associate and Assistant Professors got bigger percent of raises. What was the rationale behind this year’s negotiation to keep Professors salary mostly across the board?

In addition, is it fair that the highest paid faculty member in COAS got a raise through compression and inversion?

Response from John White, President UFF-UNF

The compression and inversion model was designed to address across-rank departmental compression (i.e., associate and full professors who made less than 112.5% of the departmental median of the next lower rank). The model did not account for the issue of within-rank compression that is at the heart of this question. The rationale behind the choice of this model is simple: the amount of funding provided to address compression and inversion ($1 million) was, though very welcome, far too low to address the problem in its entirety. To put the issue into perspective, addressing C & I for Coggin faculty would alone have consumed at least 40% of the total C & I funds. In addition, the model addressed one of the primary aims of President Delaney: to provide more money to the lowest paid associate and assistant professors.

In terms of percentages, because assistant professors and associate professors far outnumber full professors at UNF, a much larger percentage of the total raise pool (including the 4% across-the-board raises) went to these ranks. Nonetheless, full professors in departments in which their median salary was less than 112.5% of the median associate professor salary did receive C & I adjustments (excepting for those individuals making over $130,000 per year).

The questioner asks: “[I]s it fair that the highest paid faculty member in COAS got a raise through compression and inversion?” The salary model—applied consistently and per fair labor practices—required it. All raises were based on nine-month pay rates rather than total annual salary (the salary table reflects faculty members’ contracted annual salaries). The faculty member in question is contracted for 12 months of full time work; when adjusted for nine months, her salary is 33% less than shown in the table. In addition, because the model’s calculations were based upon department-rank groups and because several full professors in this person’s department were compressed—thus pulling down the median salary for that group—she received a C & I adjustment.

 

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Law Defines Professors as Management

(and thus not eligible for collective bargaining)

Full-time faculty members at Ohio public institutions are objecting to proposed legislation with big implications for their right to organize unions. Tucked deep into a 3,090-page budget bill pending before the state’s House Finance Committee is language that would reclassify professors who participate in virtually anything other than teaching and research as supervisors or managers, and therefore exempt from collective bargaining. So serving on a committee, for example, turns a professor into a manager. 

For the entire text of the article, click HERE.

 

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Outstanding Faculty Service Award, 2014-2015

Dr. Susan Perez

UNF-UFF Vice President & Associate Professor of Psychology

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In addition to her many and ongoing service contributions to UNF, Susan has been an essential part of our faculty’s union. Currently serving as our chapter’s vice president, she has this year alone led the bargaining team (recently completing nine month’s worth of negotiations on a three-year contract), served as a union-administration liaison and as grievance co-counsel, and has been a writer and/or editor of virtually all UNF-UFF communications with faculty. She is very deserving of this recognition!

CONGRATULATIONS SUSAN!

 

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When Teaching Becomes a Crime

A proposed Kansas bill would make it easy for educators to face jail time for showing “harmful materials.” Lawmakers say they are only trying to protect students, but are they really trying to discredit public school educators?

Click HERE to read full article.

 

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IMPORTANT UPDATE: GUNS ON CAMPUS

guns_on_campusDespite predictions to the contrary, the Guns on Campus bill has continued to move forward. The bill has strong backing from the National Rifle Association and a group called Students for Concealed Carry. In content and form, the bill largely mirrors the model legislation created by and advocated for by the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). Most recently and possibly most egregiously, the bill’s sponsors–after having received much criticism on the ramifications of the bill–have now started arguing that the bill is meant to protect female students from would-be attackers (citing the number of sex offenders within an arbitrary radius of campuses). Having already capitalized on an irrational fear of mass shootings on campuses, the bill’s proponents are now using threats of sexual violence against women  to promote their bill (disregarding the wealth of evidence showing that handguns are far more often used against their owners–including women–than for protecting their owners). Threats of sexual assault were the focus of a recent CBS report on the issue (click image below for that story).

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CBS News Report on Florida’s Guns on Campus Bill and the larger national push for the measure

We are still hopeful that valid data and sensibility will win out over the empty rhetoric of the gun lobby when the bill comes to the respective education subcommittees. However, opponents to the bill should take no chances. To that end, our union chapter, most of our sister chapters, and the statewide organization have each passed resolutions opposing this bill and have roundly condemned the bill’s rationale to the bill’s sponsors, to appropriate legislative subcommittees, and to local and state press organizations. UNF recently expressed its concerns regarding this bill on First Coast Connect. For more information on the union’s position on the bill, see what FSU’s Union President wrote for the NEA Advocate.

We encourage all concerned faculty to voice their concerns regarding these bills (HB 4007 and SB 176) to their state senator and state house representative. Click HERE to find your representative and to get information on how to contact them.

The UNF-UFF Resolution:

Be it resolved that we, the Chapter Council of the United Faculty of Florida at the University of North Florida, oppose proposed legislation that would allow concealed weapons on university campuses. We support the arguments and evidence suggesting that an increase in deadly firearms on campus will not enhance the safety of our students, faculty, or staff because of the potential increase in collateral damage, accidental shootings, and confusion regarding who the aggressor is in a given situation.

 

OTHER LEGISLATIVE NEWS:

The Senate Higher Education Committee voted to support a bill that would provide exemptions to Florida’s Sunshine Law as it pertains to president, provost and dean searches 7-2. The next Committee stop in the Senate is the Governmental Oversight and Accountability Committee. You can find a list of Committee members here.

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Screen Shot 2015-02-17 at 3.06.31 PMMore than 500 researchers sign NCLB letter to Congress: stop test-focused reforms

 

Screen Shot 2015-02-17 at 5.27.58 PMCourt upholds college tenure changes

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UNF-CUPA Salary Comparisons

Click UNF – CUPA Faculty Salaries Comparisons   for the Budget Advisory Committee’s findings and recommendations based upon examinations of UNF faculty salaries. Bringing UNF faculty salaries up to the CUPA averages is one of our chapter’s primary goals.

 

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UFF-UNF Chapter Council

Officers, Senators, and Committee Chairs are expected to attend.  Lunch will be served and the location is TBD.

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UFF-UNF Chapter Council

Officers, Senators, and Committee Chairs are expected to attend.  Lunch will be served and the location is TBD.

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UFF-UNF Chapter Council

Officers, Senators, and Committee Chairs are expected to attend.  Lunch will be served and the location is TBD.

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New Faculty Happy Hour

The United Faculty of Florida, UNF Chapter, would like to invite you to a New Faculty Happy Hour!

Join us for local beer, wine, and amazing appetizers.  This is your opportunity to meet our 50+ new faculty just joining UNF.  Members and non-members are welcome!  Great drinks, food, and colleagues await you!

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